Pregnancy and Risks of Gestational Diabetes

Pregnancy and Risks of Gestational Diabetes

Pregnancy and Risks of Gestational Diabetes

Pregnant woman holding glucose meter with sugar level and orange, diabetes during pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes is a condition that some women may experience during their pregnancy. Normally, your body produces insulin in order to balance blood glucose or sugar. During pregnancy, sometimes our bodies work differently to accommodate and nourish the baby. In a pregnant woman, the placenta produces hormones that can resist insulin, causing insulin resistance, making it difficult for the pancreas to break down and use insulin. If there is not enough insulin in the blood, then the sugar (glucose) will not convert to energy. The problem with this is that the body then overcompensates by creating more insulin, sometimes more than triple the normal amount. When a pregnant woman has an increased amount of insulin in her bloodstream, then she is diagnosed with gestational diabetes. In addition, a diagnosis of gestational diabetes occurs when a pregnant woman experiences high blood glucose levels and never had diabetes previously. Gestational diabetes is more common in women who are black, Hispanic, or American Indian.

If you are pregnant and experience increased amount of thirst and are always reaching for water, urinate frequently, have repeated vaginal or bladder infections, blurred vision, or nausea then notify your physician immediately about the symptoms. Your physician will have you screened for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care visit between 24 and 28 weeks. To get your blood glucose level tested you will need to drink a special, sweet syrup drink, approximately 50 grams of sugar and similar to soda, provided to you by the medical lab. Then you will need to follow specific instructions which explain when and how you will get your blood drawn after you consume the solution. If the bloodwork shows elevated or abnormal levels of blood sugar you may need to take a more intensive Glucose Tolerance Test. Your physician will discuss the results with you and notify you if you have gestational diabetes.

You can control gestational with a specific diet and an exercise regimen. There are nutritionists and dieticians who can help plan your meals and a physical fitness routine. You will also be taught how to monitor your blood sugar. It is fairly common for gestation diabetes to resolve after the birth of the baby.

We are here to help you through the journey of creating a family and we will assist you with any concerns you may have about pregnancy, surrogacy, and egg donation. Your health and well-being are of the utmost importance to us, so feel free to reach out to us with any questions.